Bourek Algéroise (Algerian Fried Meat Pastry)

Bourek Algéroise (Algerian Fried Meat Pastry)

As a Filipino I grew up preparing a similar dish to Bourek called Lumpia. It’s thin crispy layers of dough wrapped around a meat filling. It’s funny how a dish can be similarly made all around the world. But on the Mediterranean the dish has primarily the same name. You can order börek in Turkey, byrek in Albania, byorek in Armenia, boureki in Greece, bourekas in Israel, burek in the Balkans, and even brik in Tunisia. And you’ll end up with a delectable fried pastry. In Algeria the pastry is made with a circular wrapper called dioule but you can easily substitute them with Chinese spring roll wrappers as they are more readily available in the US.

Bourek is a staple on the Algerian table during Ramadan. Easily pair with chorba and serve with fresh lemon.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound minced meat (beef, chicken, lamb)
  • 10-15 wrappers
  • cheese ( I use Salvadorian frying cheese, but cream cheese, laughing cow or even sliced cheese can be used, its up to your preference.
  • 1 diced onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • salt to taste

Directions:

  1. In a large pan saute onions, sprinkle with salt to help sweat them.
  2. Add minced meat and brown.
  3. Season with spices and add parsley.
  4. Thoroughly cook and set aside to cool.
  5. Once cool peel apart a wrapper and fill with about 2 tablespoons meat and a slice of cheese, again use your preference on cheese and how much you would like to use.
  6. Fold one side over, then the other.
  7. Begin rolling forward from the bottom and continue rolling until there is no more wrapper. You can seal with water or even egg wash but is not necessarily needed.
  8. Continue wrapping until all wrappers and meat mixture have been used.
  9. Then in a new pan heat up a 1/2 inch of vegetable oil over medium heat and place bourek in pan.
  10. Fry until all sides are a golden brown.
  11. Garnish with more parsley and serve with lemon.

*You can prepare bourek in advance and freeze them. Just take them out 10 minute before frying to thaw.

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Dolma (Algerian Stuffed Vegetables)

Dolma

Is Dolma an Algerian or Turkish recipe? That is the question Shakespeare. Surprisingly Shakespeare was around when the Turkish brought the Dolma recipe to Algeria under the Ottoman Empire. In Turkey the recipe is actually called Dolmak which means “to be stuffed”. Countless items can be turned into “Dolma” such as squid, cabbage, grape leaves and even chicken breast. Traditionally the Dolma is stuffed with a meat mixture and if it’s not it’s referred to as “Fake Dolmak” so don’t be that person that serves fake dolma!!

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound minced beef
  • 1 onion diced
  • 1/4 cup rice (presoaked for 10 minutes)
  • 1/3 cup chopped parsley
  • 3 zucchini chopped into thirds
  • 4-5 small potatoes
  • 2-3 roma tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 8 cups hot water

Directions:

  1. Start by preparing the vegetables. Zucchinis are always peeled in 3-4 sections as shown below. Then halved or cut into thirds depending on how big they are. Carefully hollow each vegetable. This takes some practice, start out slow!
  2. Then in a large bowl mix minced beef, rice, parsley, cinnamon, salt and pepper.
  3. Fill vegetables with meat and roll what is left over into meatballs.
  4. In a large pot heat olive oil over medium heat and add onions. Sprinkle with salt to sweat onions.
  5. Add meatballs if any, and brown.
  6. Then coordinate vegetables so they all stand up.
  7. Slowly add 8 cups hot water, add salt and bring to a boil.
  8. After 1 minute of boiling lower heat to a simmer and cover pot.
  9. Cook for an additional 30 minutes.
  10. Garnish with parsley.

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Khobz el Dar (Algerian House Bread)

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This has to be my most favorite Algerian bread. It is so light and fluffy just like a cake. I remember waking up to the smell of fresh baked bread almost every morning when my husband’s family came to visit last year. I know I know, I’m the host and I should of been up before “Yemma” to bake bread but in the Algerian culture when your mother in law comes your kitchen is NO LONGER your kitchen. Khobz el Dar translate into “Bread of the House” and this recipe is literally the bread mascot for ours, lol. There’s quite a few ways to add variation to the bread. You can add nigelle seeds inside, but as Yemma made it she put it just on the outside and I have a tendency to make it like her. Why change perfection? am I right??? But also you can cover the bread with sesame seeds and even semolina. You just have to find out which one you like.

  • 2 1/4 cups flour
  • 2 1/4 cups semolina flour
  • 8 ounces warm water +/-
  • 3 ounces oil
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 3 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-2 tablespoons nigelle seeds
  1. In a large bowl mix semolina, flour, yeast, sugar and salt.
  2. Create a well in the middle and add one beaten egg, oil and half of water.
  3. Slowly add water as you mix.
  4. Keep mixing until you have created a soft dough. You may need more water. Sprinkle dough with water opposed to pouring a certain amount.
  5. Knead for 30 minutes until smooth and elastic. Sprinkle water from time to time. If dough is too sticking just wet your hands and continue kneading.
  6. Create a ball with wet hands as it will help the dough not stick to your hands.
  7. Cover and let rise for 45 minutes.
  8. Divide in two and place in baking pan.
  9. Brush top of dough with egg yolk.
  10. Make design and sprinkle with nigelle seeds.
  11. Bake for 30 to 45 minutes at 350°.

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Kseksou (Algerian Couscous)

Algerian Couscous

In Algeria there are many, MANY recipes to learn. But the one recipe every Algerian or anyone that is married to one or going to be, must know is…..COUSCOUS! Couscous itself is a grain made from semolina or durum wheat. But the dish “couscous” is the grain spooned over with a sauce of meat and vegetables. Yes you can prepare couscous without sauce for an easy breakfast with buttermilk on the side or sweeten it up with brown sugar and nuts as it’s eaten in Egypt.

Couscous is originally a Berber dish but has made its way around the Mediterranean. It’s actually been voted as France’s favorite dish. In the recent years the US is catching onto couscous as a healthy alternative for rice right next to quinoa and with that you can simply find the grain at your nearest Whole Foods, and even Walmart *gasps*, lol. But the catch is the traditional way of preparing couscous will not be on the label. This way is the way my husband taught me. The right way, made with love and sweat.

Ingredients:

Sauce:

  • 2 pounds meat cubed (chicken, lamb or beef)
  • 3 carrots cut into 3 sections
  • 3 small potatoes cut into quarters
  • 2 zucchini cut into to demi circles
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 tomato or 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup chickpeas (soaked overnight)
  • 3-4 leaves fresh mint
  • 1 tablespoon paprika (my husband likes the sauce very red, you may use less.
  • 1 teaspoon ras el hanout
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • salt and black pepper to taste
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cups water

Couscous:

  • 3 cups couscous grain
  • 1 stick of butter
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt to taste

Directions:

Sauce:

  1. In your couscousiere heat the 4 tablespoons of olive over medium heat.
  2. Add meat and garlic and brown.
  3. Season with spices, salt, black pepper, paprika, ras el hanout, cayenne powder and cinnamon.
  4. Add tomato or tomato paste and caramelize.
  5. Add potatoes, carrots and chickpeas.
  6. Cover with water and bring to a boil.
  7. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
  8. During the 30 minutes you can prepare the couscous and steam over sauce or cook it completely.
  9. After the sauce has cooked for 30 minutes add zucchini and mint. Cook for an additional 10 minutes.
  10. Set aside.

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Couscous:

  1. In a large bowl spread out couscous and pour in 1/2 cup of water.
  2. Mix thoroughly and then lightly drizzle with olive oil to make sure each grain does not stick. Mix until every grain is separated.
  3. Bring pot of water to boil and place couscous in steamer over boiling water. Steam for 10 minutes.
  4. Remove couscous and place back into bowl.
  5. Add half the stick of butter and let cool until you are able to handle the couscous.
  6. Mix butter and make sure that there are no clumps of couscous.
  7. Place back into steamer and steam for an additional 10 minutes.
  8. Again remove couscous and place into bowl.
  9. Add remaining 1/2 stick of butter and let cool until you are able to handle the couscous.
  10. Mix butter and make sure that are no clumps of couscous.
  11. Place back into steamer and steam for the last time for 15 minutes.
  12. Remove couscous and place back into bowl.
  13. Salt to taste and make sure the couscous is clump-free and fluffy.
  14. Serve with sauce.

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